Themes
Knock Knock

Knock Knock

about introductions, jokes, and local activism. It is going door to door and meeting face to face. Whether addressing political canvassing in this election year or trick-or-treating, the theme questions: what does it mean to be neighborly in the South? What do we owe one another? Employing matter-of-fact revelations or grappling with complex truths, Knock Knock speaks to proximity and presence. It is relational, even familial, in application. It also includes actual entrances, artistic thresholds, as well as metaphorical doors opening—and sometimes—slamming shut. Knock Knock is art that addresses architecture, “hitting the pavement,” and cul-de-sacs. It is an opportunity offered and (maybe) revoked. Who's there?

Features
Interview

I want folks here to see that our state has always influenced the art world. There’s a saying that “all roads lead through North Carolina,” and I truly believe that.

Jan 30, 2024

Robert Alan Grand speaks with curator Maya Brooks on her love for fiber arts and the dedicated curatorial work behind The Threads We Follow, on view at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina through March 10, 2024.

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Mood Ring
A Companion for Departure
A Companion for Departure

Pulling from loss, the physical drop of objects and bodies, and three-channel videos, Arkansas-based artist Bethany Springer considers the slow-motion process of grieving, scientific experiments, and action as existence.

Reader Burnaway Reader
Recents

“I can build anything I want to build. I’m not a narrative painter. I don’t do the idea or the painting being the illustration of an idea, I don’t do that. It’s all about the materiality of the paint,” notes the late Jack Whitten. In February's Art21 x Burnaway feature, we pay homage to the Alabama-born artist's fifty-year career and ingenuity for invention.

In the first Oolite x BA feature of 2024, Francess Archer Dunbar reflects on the Department of Reflection's work in deconstructing the story of Miami, Miami Beach, and the bridges that unite and divide them.