ROAD TRIP #6: Roundup

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BURNAWAY Magazine presents ROAD TRIP, a summer photo series covering critics Lilly Lampe’s and Alex Robins’s path as they make a circuitous journey from Atlanta to Brooklyn. Below find final highlights from the road!


There were a few stops and sites that didn’t make it into our other posts, but are certainly worth mentioning:

Mussels from brussels pizza at Pig Ate My Pizza, a pop-up of Travail Restaurant in Robbinsdale, MN
Mussels from brussels pizza at Pig Ate My Pizza, a pop-up of Travail Restaurant in Robbinsdale, MN. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

We had an amazing pizza dinner in Robbinsdale, MN of all places at Pig Ate My Pizza. Not pictured: chicken mole pizza, ribs, and carrot and ginger soup. The farm to table movement has officially arrived in Minnesota.
Cantilevered porch at the House on the Rock in Spring Green, WI
Cantilevered porch at the House on the Rock in Spring Green, WI. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

Between Minnesota and Chicago we camped in Spring Green, Wisconsin, home of the House on the RockTaliesin, and not much else.
One of many rooms of automated instruments at the House on the Rock.
One of many rooms of automated instruments at the House on the Rock. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

The House on the Rock is a large and unique structure designed by Alex Jordan Jr. which today houses a variety of automatons, collections of oddities, and a large merry-go-round.
The House on the Rock's carousel, purportedly the largest in history with over 20,000 light bulbs and 269 animals (none of which is a horse). Photo by Lilly Lampe.
The House on the Rock’s carousel, purportedly the largest in history with over 20,000 light bulbs and 269 animals (none of which is a horse). Photo by Lilly Lampe.

 
Carved ivory at the House on the Rock. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Carved ivory at the House on the Rock. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

There’s an eccentric air to the whole enterprise, which is today the most popular tourist attraction in Wisconsin.
Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin in Spring Green, WI from afar. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin in Spring Green, WI from afar. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

Just a few miles down the road from the House on the Rock is Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin. Wright had high aspirations for Taliesin and intended it to be both his summer home and a teaching school for young architects. He moved in with his mistress, Mamah Borthwick Cheney, who had been married to his client Edwin Cheney, and her two children after leaving his wife and family behind in Chicago.
Taliesin, however, became a site of tragedy and grief for Wright. While Wright was away working on a commission in Chicago, a manservant by the name of Julian Carlton set fire to the building and murdered seven people, including Cheney and her children, as they tried to escape.
We didn’t have time to do the tour (and at $50 a head, it’s one of the more expensive Frank Lloyd Wright houses to see) but drove around the exterior.
In Buffalo, NY—our first stop after Toronto and Niagara—we did tour Wright’s Martin House. This sprawling multi-house complex is considered one of the best examples of Wright’s Prairie Style. It’s been beautifully restored and was a real treat to see.
Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House in Buffalo, NY. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House in Buffalo, NY. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

 
Frank Lloyd Wright's Darwin Martin House in Buffalo, NY. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House in Buffalo, NY. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

Buffalo has several other notable architectural sites, including Louis Sullivan’s Prudential (originally Guaranty) Building. The exterior combines masonry and terra cotta detailing to a wonderfully ornate effect.
Detail of Louis Sullivan's Prudential (Guaranty) Building, 1895. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Detail of Louis Sullivan’s Prudential (Guaranty) Building, 1895. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

 
Detail of Louis Sullivan's Prudential (Guaranty) Building, 1895. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Detail of Louis Sullivan’s Prudential (Guaranty) Building, 1895. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

We couldn’t make a trip to Buffalo without stopping by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Though we enjoyed the exhibitions, I was most taken with some gems in the permanent collection…
Detail of Sol Lewitt Wall Drawing #1268 Scribbles, conceived 2006, executed 2010. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Detail of Sol Lewitt’s Wall Drawing #1268 Scribbles, conceived 2006, executed 2010. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

like Sol Lewitt’s Wall Drawing #1268 Scribbles, which fills a stairwell…
Installation of Rachel Whiteread's Untitled (Domestic), 2002, and Tracey Emin's Only God Knows I'm Good, 2009 (neon, in the background) with a bench from Jenny Holzer's Untitled (The Buffalo Installation), 1991, at Albright-Knox. Photo by Lilly Lampe.
Installation of Rachel Whiteread’s Untitled (Domestic), 2002, and Tracey Emin’s Only God Knows I’m Good, 2009 (neon, in the background) with a bench from Jenny Holzer’s Untitled (The Buffalo Installation), 1991, at Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Photo by Lilly Lampe.

…Rachel Whiteread’s Untitled (Domestic), 2002 installed with Tracey Emin’s Only God Knows I’m Good, 2009, and Jenny Holzer’s Untitled (The Buffalo Installation), 1991.
We ended our summer adventures in Mill Run, PA at Wright’s famed Fallingwater house.
Fallingwater, photo by Lilly Lampe.
Fallingwater, photo by Lilly Lampe.

Built over a thirty-foot waterfall over thirty years after the Martin House, Fallingwater is a dramatic departure from the Prairie style and the finest example of Wright’s Organic work.
Lilly Lampe and Alex Robbins at Fallingwater.
Lilly Lampe and Alex Robbins at Fallingwater.

Thanks for following us on our travels!


 
 
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