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Features

Pixels

BA contributor Claire E. Dempster considers pixels in contemporary life and artmaking, updating Rosalind Krauss’s “Grids” for the twenty-first century.

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As we begin a new year, BURNAWAY looks ahead to ten exhibitions we’re anticipating in 2019, including shows in Atlanta, Richmond, New Orleans, Lexington, and elsewhere.

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BURNAWAY’s Best of 2018

As the year comes to a close, BURNAWAY Executive Director Erin Jane Nelson and Editor Logan Lockner reflect on their favorite exhibitions in the South in 2018.

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Photographer Mike Smith has spent nearly the past 40 years documenting the strangeness, poverty, grace, and pain of his adopted home in East Tennessee. A selection of Smith’s work is featured in the group show “Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South” at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art in Charleston.

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On December 1, Atlanta-based writer Logan Lockner, who has been serving as BURNAWAY’s interim editor in a temporary capacity for the last three months, will join the organization permanently as editor. As Logan will be responsible for guiding the magazine’s content in coming years, we asked him a few questions about his history with and plans…

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As new technologies continue to pervade our everyday lives, attendant policies must proactively protect users from exploitation. Interdisciplinary artist Xin Xin, an assistant professor in Media Design and Women’s Studies at the University of Georgia, works at the intersections of technology, labor, and identity. Their exhibition “Labor in a Single Shot,” on view in the…

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Founded by artist R.D. King in 2017, Extended Play is an independent small press based in Nashville, with projects produced in collaboration between King and other local and regional artists. For example, We Love You We Know You Always Watch We Will Try To Do Better Next Year is an anarchic send-up of Christmas-themed kids’…

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In his controversial notion of “Third-World literature,” first outlined in an essay published in 1986, Marxist cultural theorist Fredric Jameson argues that a certain subset of literature—that of nations problematically characterized as belonging to the so-called “Third World”—projects an inextricable political dimension on the individual, always narrating personal experience as a form of national allegory….

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On a short, leisurely walk we recently took together, Atlanta-based artist Iman Person led me along the proposed path for Waterlust, her upcoming installation for Flux Projects’ latest iteration, FLUX: Grant Park.  The weekend-long, park-wide exhibition shows a new approach to the organization’s public art events, such as the widely-panned, most recent FLUX Night in…

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 I met Katya over a decade ago when we were both students at Cooper Union in New York. In school, she was the gregarious class clown and cool girl, making irreverent, slapstick paintings and art-cum-standup comedy that charmed students and professors alike. Back then, her energy and work evoked the joie de vivre and sarcastic…

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While paintings or sculptures might be compared to any number of things, few would think to compare such physically static objects to the dynamic, flowing form of a waterfall. As American philosopher Susanne Langer argues, however, the comparison is quite apt. For example, neither the flowing water nor the ridge it goes over is the…

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