Larson Shindelman: Geolocation at the Halsey Institute, Charleston

By February 28, 2021
Installation view of Geolocation at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. Image courtesy of Rick Rhodes and the Halsey Institute.
Larson Shindelman, Geolocation: Have My Location?, 2011; archival pigment print, 24 x 20 inches.
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Larson Shindelman, Geolocation: I Know You Are Scared, 2011; archival Pigment Print, 24 x 20 inches.
Installation view of Geolocation at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. Image courtesy of Rick Rhodes and the Halsey Institute.

Geolocation presents two series of works by artist duo Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, Geolocation and #Mobilize. Using publicly-accessible geographic data from tweets, Larson Shindelman track down specific locations where Twitter users were when they posted on social media. Once there, the artists make a photograph from the location, connecting the tweet—stored on a remote server and readable around the globe—and the physical world. This body of work explores the connection between text and images, digital and analog, and private versus public.

“Our collaborative work is a means for situating this virtual communication in the physical realm. We imagine ourselves as virtual flâneurs, ethnographers of the Internet, exploring cities 140 characters at a time through the lives of others.”

from the accompanying exhibition text

Larson Shindelman, #Mobilize (Haunting Shadow), 2018; archival pigment print, 30 x 40 inches.
Larson Shindleman, #Mobilize (Black Girls are Enough), 2018; archival pigment print, 30 x 40 inches.
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Installation view of Geolocation at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. Image courtesy of Rick Rhodes and the Halsey Institute.
Larson Shindleman, Geolocation: Make Sure I’m Happy, 2012; archival pigment print, 24 x 20 inches.
Larson Shindelman, Geolocation: So Proud of Me, 2012; archival pigment print, 24 x 20 inches.

Geolocation is on view at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary art through March 5, 2021.

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