Reviews

At the Met Breuer in New York, an exhibition focused on sculptures by the late artist Jack Whitten demonstrates connections between his work and his Southern heritage, as well as his lifelong interests in traditional African sculpture and ancient Greek cultures.

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The twentieth century in America would undoubtedly look very different without Garry Winogrand having documented it. His images of protest movements, interracial couples, the dying days of the Fifties, and economic uncertainty coexisting with America’s native ebullience complicated the nation’s vision of itself. In his incredibly revealing images, Winogrand offers remarkable access and detail. His…

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It’s arguable that our art historical moment will be defined by revisionism. Though this impulse isn’t new, a conglomeration of exhibitions over the past decade have rightfully sought to reassess the legacies of artists—often women and people of color—whose practices have been overlooked by museums or excluded from the canon of artworks taught in universities…

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The daily demands of living—work, school, care of self or others—may require posing. But in moments of leisure and repose, you can perhaps temporarily shed such self-consciousness. The pose may be loosened. The acting may cease. One might respond to the world—at the park, in the home, at a party— naturally, without affectation. In the…

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“The general consensus of the contemporary mass media is that the return of religion has emerged as the most important factor in global politics and culture today,” claims critic and theorist Boris Groys in his 2009 e-flux article “Religion in the Age of Digital Reproduction.” Groys goes on to describe this “revival of religion” as being…

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Characterized by the robotic sexual gestures of dancing women luring customers inside a discount store, or the surreal circumstance of characters listening to North Korean propaganda announcements dusting the South Korean landscape like acid rain, director Lee Chang-dong’s latest film, Burning, shows a world defined by a pervasive sense of disconnection. In Burning, Lee paints…

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In her exhibition “God Sees Through Houses,” on view from August 27 through October 18, Nashville-based painter Jodi Hays displayed a new body of work at Lipscomb University’s recently relocated Hutcheson Gallery. Comprised of framed drawings and large- and small-scale oil paintings, the work was created during the crisis of family separations at the US-Mexico border created…

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“For the Constructivists, social condensation was about filling architecture with a sort of revolutionary political electricity. As theorized, designed, and built, the Social Condenser was to be an architectural device for electrocuting people into a communist way of life”.  —Michał Murawski and Jane Rendell,  “The Social Condenser: A Century of Revolution through Architecture, 1917-2017”  …

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The paintings currently on view in San Francisco-based artist Melissa Carter’s solo exhibition “New Masters” at Institute 193 in Lexington are small neither in scale nor ambition, addressing the art-historical misogyny of previous generations of male artists as well as more contemporary concerns with sexual assault and harassment in the wake of this year’s #MeToo movement. Though…

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“It’s not like, ‘Oh, we wanted to capture beautiful images.’ It’s not about beauty,” Zanele Muholi told an attentive crowd gathered in a half-moon around them. (Muholi uses the pronouns they and them.) The photographer stood on a small white stool as they explained the process behind the photographs on view in “Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail…

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Nashville-based artist Brandon Donahue is one of the city’s busiest, most prolific creators. His exhibition “No Look Past,” on view at the Nashville outpost of David Lusk Gallery through September 29,  is the artist’s third solo exhibition this year, following “Outta Bounds” at Vanderbilt University’s Space 204 and “RIP” at Elephant Gallery. Donahue’s multimedia practice…

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Last February, I met artist and musician Lonnie Holley at Atlanta Contemporary during the run of his solo exhibition “I Snuck Off the Slave Ship.” During a walkthrough of the show with the artist and visiting critic Ben Davis of Artnet News, Holley asked me what I did, wondering if I was an artist or a…

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Currently on view at Little Rock’s Historic Arkansas Museum, “That Survival Apparatus,” an exhibition by emerging artist Justin Tyler Bryant featuring enigmatic portraits of African American luminaries, spans the media of lithography, book arts, and painting. Through the artist’s delicate grayscale renderings of his subjects’ mouths, cheeks, and jawlines—and the complete erasure or absence of…

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Photographer Ralph Eugene Meatyard called himself a “dedicated amateur,” despite a bevy of evidence that suggested he was anything but. He was the longtime de facto leader of the Lexington Camera Club, a rigorous and generative hobbyist group active from 1936 through the mid-70s that included members such as Van Deren Coke, Guy Mendes, Thomas…

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The second set of exhibitions at the recently opened Tif Sigfrids and Howard’s—two distinct galleries operating out of a shared, three-room space—brings the work of artists Charles Harlan, Eleanor Ray, and Ree Morton to Athens, GA. While the Harlan and Ray exhibitions are presented by gallerists Tif Sigfrids and Ridley Howard, respectively, Morton’s work on…

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Junco Sato Pollack’s exhibition “Meditation in Space and Time” at Swan Coach House Gallery is a retrospective of the Japanese-born fabric artist’s work in the sense that the pieces included by curator Marianne Lambert were created between 1995 and now. What most unites the work on view, however, is not the artist’s personal history but her practice of…

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