WonderRoot Podcasts: Michi Meko is “Gone Fishing”

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Courtesy Michi Meko.
Courtesy Michi Meko.

In this wide ranging chat with Floyd Hall, Michi Meko talks about his feelings for the rural and urban South, his philosophical approach to his work, TINDELMICHI, the growth of Atlanta’s arts community, and why he’s “gone fishing.”

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Michi Meko’s work as a multi-disciplinary artist draws influence from rural southern culture and contemporary urban subcultures. He has developed a system of gathering that allows for hybridizing and remixing the contents into a multilingual dialect, and endowing ordinary and rejected objects with historic and spiritual powers. By reworking and mashing up iconography, the works begin to establish a new identity: an identity with possibilities of life to come, giving voice to the forgotten, and demonstrating significant resiliency and strength that offers hope and possibility. The works allude to conditions both physical and psychological, and are a proclamation of perseverance and remembrance.

Audio: Click the player above to listen to Hall’s conversation with Michi Meko, or download the MP3.

 

Georgia Museum of Art

 

BURNAWAY Radio shares WonderRoot podcasts. The WonderRoot podcast series offers listeners a vast array of conversations and insights into WonderRoot and the Atlanta cultural community, while continuing our mission of uniting artists and community to inspire social change. These conversations also serve as a platform to highlight the wide spectrum of artists and initiatives that impact Atlanta, with an eye to how these discussions may also affect the global communities in which we live. WonderRoot believes that artists have the potential to change the world; we are artists giving back to the community that has done so much to inspire us.

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BURNAWAY Radio is supported in part by Georgia Council for the Arts through the appropriations of the Georgia General Assembly. Georgia Council for the Arts also receives support from its partner agency, the National Endowment for the Arts.