BOOKMARKS: Louise Shaw's March Reading List

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BOOKMARKS are short reading lists recommended by artists and arts professionals in and around Atlanta. It is our hopes that these links to further readings will help support an outward focus, fostering broader conversations around visual culture in today’s society.

SCAD - Derrick Adams

This month we spoke with Louise Shaw, museum curator at the David J. Spencer CDC Museum:

1. I am intrigued by post, recently launched the by Museum of Modern Art:

post is a site for encounters between the established and experimental, the historical and emerging, the local and global, the scholarly and artistic. An online journal, archive, exhibition space, and open forum that takes advantage of the nonhierarchical nature of the Internet, post seeks to spark in-depth explorations of the ways in which modernism is being redefined. The site’s contents are intended to build nuanced understandings of the histories that shape the practices of artists and institutions today. As a networked platform, post aims to provide an alternative to the model of a unified art historical narrative.

Photo: screen capture from home page of post: http://post.at.moma.org/

2. Southern Spaces is a really smart on-line interdisciplinary journal “about regions, places, and cultures of the U.S. South and their global connections” that comes out of Emory University. 

The F Word at Hunter Museum

3. I just finished reading NWZadie Smith’s recent and highly-praised novel.

4. The Morbid Anatomy blog, which surveys “the interstices of art, medicine, death and culture,” is the brainchild of Joanna Ebenstein. The Morbid Anatomy Library, located on the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, is a delightful and quirky place to visit when in New York.

Image: “The human body and the library as sources of knowledge,” frontispiece of Tabulae Anatomicae, Early 18th cent., Johann Adam Kulmus; found via the National Library of Medicine’s “Images from the History of Medicine;” featured here: http://morbidanatomy.blogspot.com/2009/12/national-library-of-medicines-history.html

 

5. Shack/Slum Dwellers International:
I just became acquainted with this amazing “global network of the urban poor” through Design With the Other 90%: CITIES, currently installed at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum. I just signed up for its newsletter.

 

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