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“Miecznikowski” is Kirstin Mitchell’s original family name, and the name of her Working Artist Project exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia through September 8. It was the Polish family name of her father, whose approaching death shaped the trajectory of this show without determining its content. This body of work (emphasis on…

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There was something about the little trip-step that occasionally broke the performers’ unison walking pattern executed with laser intensity and fluid intention as one of the opening salvos of Tere O’Connor‘s new work, Long Run, at Duke’s Reynolds Industries Theater on July 10-11. The interrupting hiccup in the pattern signaled the redemptive potential of complexity….

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Art Vandenberg’s combined fascination with mathematics and the art practice of indigenous cultures come together in the very short-run exhibition “#Day25,000” at Poem 88, which closes this Saturday, July 14. The seeming chaos of brightly colored boards, nails and knotted cords hung in parallel lines are in reality a completely logical shorthand for the days…

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Since the early 1980s, British artist and filmmaker John Akomfrah has offered up some of the strongest aesthetic responses to the intersecting discourses of history, identity, and culture for those excluded from power. Alongside such famed New Left intellectuals as Richard Hoggart and Stuart Hall who through their work made it impossible to ignore the role…

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Along with the documentary Advanced Style about women of a certain age with enviable, age-resistant personal style, Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist joins the ranks of films about badass oldies, in this case 77-year-old punk rock British designer Vivienne Westwood, the woman who famously dressed the Sex Pistols, collaborated with Situationist provocateur Malcom McLaren on turning…

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“Outliers and American Vanguard Art”—from the title, it is not immediately clear that this exhibition reconsiders art often referred to as outsider, visionary, or folk, in order to examine its relationship to the development of modern art in America. Curator Lynne Cooke chose the term “outlier” to counter the dismissive or limiting connotations that previous…

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When artist and writer John Berger died on January 2, 2017, the art world paused to remember the man, but also to remember his groundbreaking book and BBC television series “Ways of Seeing.” In Nashville, Third Man Records (owned by musician Jack White) even held a 16mm screening of the entire series a few months…

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In Rachel Kushner’s electrifying 2013 novel The Flamethrowers, about a young woman who falls in with a fictionalized crew of post-conceptualists in 1970s New York, an artist tells the unnamed protagonist, “You don’t have to immediately become an artist… You have the luxury of time. You’re young. Young people are doing something even when they’re…

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True to his reputation as an online provocateur, former Atlanta-based artist Pastiche Lumumba appropriates a phrase from Twitter vernacular, “Don’t @ Me,” as the title for his solo show, on view at the recently opened Gallery by WISH in Little Five Points through June 8. Perhaps best known as one of the co-founders of the now defunct Low Museum, Lumumba…

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With “Inhuman,” his first solo show at Sandler Hudson Gallery, Atlanta-based artist William Downs expands upon the evocative visual language he previously developed in ink-wash works on paper, reimagining iconic figurative depictions from Western art history, such as Cézanne’s Bathers, in a muddled, dreamlike style. Created using a technique derived from traditional Japanese calligraphy, the array of works in “Inhuman”…

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Los Angeles artist Kevin Cooley has created an atmospheric, tweet-activated installation at Laney Contemporary in Savannah that marks the constant slippage of time — time at the speed of sea levels rising and polar caps melting. The indirectly participatory work is engaged every time anyone, anywhere, tweets the hashtags #smokeandmirrors, #climateaction, or #ecofriendly, that real-time Twitter text…

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What does it mean to make an image of a contemporary urban city, and how does one go about doing so? What patterns and typologies would repeat themselves across the global metropolitan network, and what qualities would remain and unrepeatable? Is there something inherently singular about Los Angeles or Dubai, or is our globalized world rendering…

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For those of us who came up in the age of Xerox art, band posters, zines and the new wave/punk rock dyad, when the Lower East Side was a blighted hell hole and riot incubator instead of an open-air yogurt shop, the documentary Boom for Real : The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat is not just…

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Three exhibitions at Hathaway Gallery, closing May 31, raise a longstanding issue of interpretation that remains, sometimes, an object of contention. “Easy Air” is a three-artist show of works by Ridley Howard, Scott Ingram, and Christina A. West; “Painter” is a series of paintings by Craig Drennen, and Tyler Beard’s “Shoreline” is a multimedia installation. The…

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The recent Michelle Wolf kerfuffle is just the latest reminder that forceful and opinionated women are still an aberration in America. All the more reason to bow down to the Yoda-like wisdom and teacup fierceness of another female heroine when the world so desperately needs one: Ruth Bader Ginsburg. That rarest of specimens, Ginsburg is an elderly…

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