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In his Working Artist Project exhibition at MOCA GA, Atlanta-based artist Michi Meko confronts Black Americans’ fraught relationships with the quiet isolation offered by nature.

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In a solo exhibition at the Lower East Side gallery JTT, interdisciplinary artist Sable Elyse Smith continues her investigation of the insidious influence of the racialized criminal justice system.

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At the Met Breuer in New York, an exhibition focused on sculptures by the late artist Jack Whitten demonstrates connections between his work and his Southern heritage, as well as his lifelong interests in traditional African sculpture and ancient Greek cultures.

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The twentieth century in America would undoubtedly look very different without Garry Winogrand having documented it. His images of protest movements, interracial couples, the dying days of the Fifties, and economic uncertainty coexisting with America’s native ebullience complicated the nation’s vision of itself. In his incredibly revealing images, Winogrand offers remarkable access and detail. His…

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It’s arguable that our art historical moment will be defined by revisionism. Though this impulse isn’t new, a conglomeration of exhibitions over the past decade have rightfully sought to reassess the legacies of artists—often women and people of color—whose practices have been overlooked by museums or excluded from the canon of artworks taught in universities…

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The daily demands of living—work, school, care of self or others—may require posing. But in moments of leisure and repose, you can perhaps temporarily shed such self-consciousness. The pose may be loosened. The acting may cease. One might respond to the world—at the park, in the home, at a party— naturally, without affectation. In the…

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