Reviews

True to his reputation as an online provocateur, former Atlanta-based artist Pastiche Lumumba appropriates a phrase from Twitter vernacular, “Don’t @ Me,” as the title for his solo show, on view at the recently opened Gallery by WISH in Little Five Points through June 8. Perhaps best known as one of the co-founders of the now defunct Low Museum, Lumumba…

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With “Inhuman,” his first solo show at Sandler Hudson Gallery, Atlanta-based artist William Downs expands upon the evocative visual language he previously developed in ink-wash works on paper, reimagining iconic figurative depictions from Western art history, such as Cézanne’s Bathers, in a muddled, dreamlike style. Created using a technique derived from traditional Japanese calligraphy, the array of works in “Inhuman”…

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Los Angeles artist Kevin Cooley has created an atmospheric, tweet-activated installation at Laney Contemporary in Savannah that marks the constant slippage of time — time at the speed of sea levels rising and polar caps melting. The indirectly participatory work is engaged every time anyone, anywhere, tweets the hashtags #smokeandmirrors, #climateaction, or #ecofriendly, that real-time Twitter text…

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What does it mean to make an image of a contemporary urban city, and how does one go about doing so? What patterns and typologies would repeat themselves across the global metropolitan network, and what qualities would remain and unrepeatable? Is there something inherently singular about Los Angeles or Dubai, or is our globalized world rendering…

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For those of us who came up in the age of Xerox art, band posters, zines and the new wave/punk rock dyad, when the Lower East Side was a blighted hell hole and riot incubator instead of an open-air yogurt shop, the documentary Boom for Real : The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat is not just…

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Three exhibitions at Hathaway Gallery, closing May 31, raise a longstanding issue of interpretation that remains, sometimes, an object of contention. “Easy Air” is a three-artist show of works by Ridley Howard, Scott Ingram, and Christina A. West; “Painter” is a series of paintings by Craig Drennen, and Tyler Beard’s “Shoreline” is a multimedia installation. The…

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The recent Michelle Wolf kerfuffle is just the latest reminder that forceful and opinionated women are still an aberration in America. All the more reason to bow down to the Yoda-like wisdom and teacup fierceness of another female heroine when the world so desperately needs one: Ruth Bader Ginsburg. That rarest of specimens, Ginsburg is an elderly…

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Pete Schulte’s “The Lamplighter” is a shockingly diverse exhibition that, at a casual glance, appears to be anything but. Even though it fills the three separate venues of  the Whitespace/Whitespec/Shedspace complex and includes a sound art installation, the dominant medium is graphite on paper, and the dominant style is geometric. Thee main gallery space indicates…

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The racial category and social position constructed as whiteness operates through a set of unmarked and unnamed cultural practices that are designed and enforced to privilege its members. The art museum, with its rooms full of objects negotiating and guiding our tastes, values, and assumptions in space and time, is one of the most visible…

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Institutional critique looms large over contemporary art. In a moment when power is being held to account and representation matters, recent interventions into the formal, conceptual, and systemic workings of the art institution by artists and activist communities remind us of the urgent necessity of this practice. However, among the protests and hashtags for change…

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