Burnaway > Reviews

When President Obama started singing “Amazing Grace” in the middle of his eulogy for the nine victims of the Emanuel AME Church massacre in Charleston, South Carolina, I remember most the expression on Bishop Julius H. McAllister’s face. Sitting…

Amer Kobaslija, Before the Deluge, 2010. oil on panel.

Residence, transience, environment, and the certain temporality that affects  us all are explored in Amer Kobaslija’s latest exhibit, “A Sense of Place.” A collection of 33 paintings that range from miniature to large scale, Kobaslija’s show turns UNF Gallery…

Mary Pat Matheson will tell you today that when she joined the Atlanta Botanical Garden as CEO in 2002, one of her first major goals was to get an exhibition of famed glass artist Dale Chihuly. He had just…

In Marcus Kenney’s “Babble,” on display at Marcia Wood Midtown through June 18, the darkened memories of our collective American past bubble up into abstracted, whimsical, and sometimes frightening imagery. Kenney’s paintings combine techniques of painting, printmaking, collage, and fiber…

Distance — in time, place, and space — is paramount in Radcliffe Bailey’s work. The sculptures and works on paper at Boston’s Samsøn Projects, on view through May 28, are situated a good distance from each other, the space…

From the living legends of the city’s wild past to the Legendary Children of today, Atlanta’s queer performance artists have always had a significant presence, but their stories have remained untold to a wider audience. Queer Moxie, a new…

In the photographic works on view in “Gray Space” at Swan Coach House Gallery, artist Kelly Kristin Jones captured the plastic sheathing at various constructions sites, using it as a visual filter. These translucent sheaths, used to keep water…

The compelling exhibition “Black Chronicles II,” which ends its run at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art on Saturday, May 14, brings together over 100 photographs primarily drawn from the Hulton Archive (Getty Images) as well as private collections. The late 19th-century black-and-white…

“Recognize yourself in he and she who are not like you and me.” – Carlos Fuentes Why is the subject of immigration such a polarizing topic for most Americans? Despite the fact that most of us are descendants of…

Two installations by Alabama-born, Atlanta-based artist Cynthia Farnell at downtown Atlanta’s Gallery 72 offer two distinct looks at her family history. Closely and thematically linked, the installations are still intriguingly different in their methodology, and they also ultimately differ…

As its title suggests, “State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now” aims to capture American art of the moment. On view at the Telfair Museums Jepson Center for the Arts in Savannah, the exhibition advances living artists at…

“The 5th of July,” on view at the Atlanta Contemporary through May 1, asks how it is possible to invoke the idea of “America” by attempting to stage the single most inclusive national celebration, Independence Day, within a contemporary…

“Finding Your Way” marks the third exhibition launched in Monya Rowe’s new gallery in St. Augustine. The longtime New York gallerist relocated last fall to Florida, bringing not only a roster of artists new to the Southeast, but also…

Though Wendy Given and Ryan Pierce have parallel attractions to the Gothic beauty of the natural cycles of bloom and decay, their joint exhibition “Nocturne,” on view at Whitespace through May 7, reveals a somewhat imperfect pairing. Individual pieces…

“Field and Territory,” Kim Piotrowski’s exhibition on view at Marcia Wood Midtown through April 30, shows how painting can collapse abstraction and realism into a cohesive whole. This suite of 16 paintings, which range in size from notebook to…