High Five: 5 Shows in the South Right Now

Nina Abney
“Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush” @ Nasher Museum at Duke University, Durham, NC, through July 16

Abney first garnered notice  in 2008, when her work was included in the traveling exhibition “30 Americans,” organized by the Rubell Family Collection in Miami. Among the works in that show was Class of 2007, in which she depicted her MFA class as African American inmates in orange jumpsuits to comment on incarceration, race and inherent inequities in higher education.

Her work is informed by mainstream news media, cartoons, video games, hip-hop culture, celebrity websites and tabloid magazines. She has said that her densely packed paintings are “easy to swallow, hard to digest.” Vanity Fair magazine named her as one of the leading artists of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Abney was born in Chicago and currently resides in Jersey City, New Jersey. She earned her BFA in 2004 from Augustana College, Rock Island, IL, and her MFA in 2007 from Parsons School of Design in New York.

This 10-year survey at the Nasher features 30 paintings, watercolors and collages, as well as a site-specific mural. After the Nasher, it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center (February 10–May 6, 2018); Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the California African American Museum (September 23, 2018–January 20, 2019); and the Neuberger Museum of Art, SUNY-Purchase College (April 7–August 4, 2019).

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Nina Abney
Nina Chanel Abney, Ivy and the Janitor in January, 2009; acrylic on canvas, 54 by 60 inches. Collection of Noel Kirnon and Michael Paley. Image courtesy of Kravets | Wehby Gallery, New York, New York. 
Nina Abney
Nina Chanel Abney, First and Last, 2012; acrylic and cut paper collage on paper, 38 by 51 inches. Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. 
Nina Abney
Nina Chanel Abney, Incite (COM), 2015; unique ultrachrome pigmented print, acrylic, and spray paint on canvas; 48 by 36 inches. Collection of Isis Heslin and Jacqueline T. Martin. Image courtesy of Kravets | Wehby Gallery, New York, New York. 
Nina Abney
Nina Chanel Abney, Untitled (Yo 123), 2015; unique ultrachrome pigmented print, spray paint, and acrylic on canvas, 56 by 56 inches. Private collection. Image courtesy of Kravets | Wehby Gallery, New York, New York.
Nina Abney
Nina Chanel Abney, Untitled (Ex X), 2012; acrylic on canvas, 42 by 30 inches. Collection of Sara Levinson. 
Nina Abney
Nina Chanel Abney, Untitled (FUCK T*E *OP), 2014; acrylic on canvas, 72 by 108 inches. Collection of Kamaal Fareed. Image courtesy of Kravets Wehby Gallery, New York, New York. 

Jordan Casteel: “Harlem Notes” @ The Harvey B. Gantt Center in Charlotte, January 28 through July 8

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“Jordan Casteel: Harlem Notes” features large-scale portraits of family, friends, and neighbors of the Harlem-based painter that reveal the intimate bonds that developed between the artist and her subjects.

Born in Denver, Casteel received her BA in studio art from Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia, in 2011 ,and her MFA in painting and printmaking from the Yale School of Art in 2014. She has been an artist-in-residence at Yaddo (2015), the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Process Space on Governors Island (2015), the Studio Museum in Harlem (2015), and the Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program, in DUMBO, Brooklyn (2016). She teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and is represented by Casey Kaplan Gallery.


Jonathan VanDyke: “The Invert” @ Tops Gallery in Memphis through May 20
Jonathan VanDyke, installation view of Half Life
Jonathan VanDyke, installation view of Half Life, 2013; sewn linen, dyed linen, cast plastic, pigmented urethane in dripping sequence 26 by 32 by 4 inches. 
Jonathan VanDyke, Half Life
Jonathan VanDyke, Half Life, 2013; sewn linen, dyed linen, cast plastic, pigmented urethane in dripping sequence 26 by 32 by 4 inches.
Jonathan VanDyke, A Discipline
Jonathan VanDyke, A Discipline, 2009/17; cedar wood and Masonite, with fabricated whips and pigmented urethane in dripping sequence, approx. 37 by 40 by 7 inches.
Jonathan VanDyke, A Discipline (detail)
Jonathan VanDyke, A Discipline (detail), 2009/17; cedar wood and Masonite, with fabricated whips and pigmented urethane in dripping sequence, approx. 37 by 40 by 7 inches.
Jonathan VanDyke, A Discipline (detail)
Jonathan VanDyke, A Discipline (detail), 2009/17; cedar wood and Masonite, with fabricated whips and pigmented urethane in dripping sequence, approx. 37 by 40 by 7 inches.
Jonathan VanDyke, Tops Gallery
Jonathan VanDyke, Blue Lines [Brad and David performance sessions 14/15; body pressure sequence], 82 by 65 inches.
Jonathan VanDyke, Self Portrait as my mother, , as an Actress, as a Painter, as a Stranger, Version 5
Jonathan VanDyke, Self Portrait as My Mother, as an Actress, as a Painter, as a Stranger, Version 5, 2009- present; Performed by Terri Phillips, Memphis. 
Jonathan VanDyke, Tops Gallery, 32
Jonathan VanDyke, Self Portrait as My Mother, as an Actress, as a Painter, as a Stranger, Version 5, 2009- present; Performed by Terri Phillips, Memphis. 
Jonathan VanDyke, Self Portrait as My Mother, as an Actress, as a Painter, as a Stranger, Version 5
The performer carried a purse that leaked paint on her, the gallery floor, and down a manhole.

Jonathan VanDyke, Tops Gallery, 22 Jonathan VanDyke, Tops Gallery, 24

The exhibition title recalls Freud’s term for a homosexual, which implied a distortion that could be “straightened out.” VanDyke plays with the notions of displacement and inversion in body-oriented works such as Blue Lines. To create it, two dancers rolled over paint-dipped ropes on raw canvas, creating gestures reminiscent of Cy Twombly and Yves Klein. Another canvas inspired by Renaissance paintings of self-flagellating saints was made by striking canvas with paint-soaked whips, then cutting it into pieces and sewing it back together in a quilt pattern. The whips themselves appear in another wooden wall sculpture. For the photographic multipart piece Self Portrait as My Mother, as an Actress, as a Painter, as a Stranger, a performer showed up at the exhibition opening with paint dripping from her purse. The paint stains her dress and slowly trickles through a manhole at street level and into Tops Gallery’s below-ground space, leaving behind a trail of color on the gallery walls and floor.

VanDyke received his MFA from the Milton Avery Graduate School at Bard College. He also studied at the Glasgow School of Art, the Atlantic Center for the Arts and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. He is on the faculty of  the Low-Residency and Devised Performance MFA programs at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, and the Sotheby’s Institute in New York.


Kirsten Stolle: “Disarm” @ SECCA in Winston-Salem, April 25 through May 21

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Kirsten Stolle
Kirsten Stolle, Drone Landscape, 2017; collage on paper, 23 by 30½ inches.
Kirsten Stolle, B Elevator
Kirsten Stolle, Pit “B” Elevator, 2016; collage on archival pigment print 14 by 15½ inches.
Kirsten Stolle, Nuclear WEapons, Non-Proliferation Agreement
Kirsten Stolle, Nuclear Weapons Non-Proliferation Agreement, 2016; collage and cutouts on archival pigment print, 8 by 10 inches.
Kirsten Stolle
Kirsten Stolle, Nike Zeus Desert Missile, 2016; collage on archival photograph, 8 by 10 inches.
Kirsten Stolle
Kirsten Stolle, Nike Cajun Missile, 2016; collage and cutouts on photograph, 10 by 8 inches. 
Kirsten Stolle, Fallout Shelter
Kirsten Stolle, Fallout Shelter, 2016; collage and gold foil on archival pigment print, 15½ by 14 inches.
Kirsten Stolle, Escape hatch
Kirsten Stolle, Escape Hatch, 2016; collage on archival pigment print, 14 by 15½ inches.
Kirsten Stolle, Entry Gate
Kirsten Stolle, Entry Gate, 2016; collage on archival pigment print, 14 by 15½ inches.
Kirsten Stolle, Decontamination Shower
Kirsten Stolle, Decontamination Shower, 2016; collage on archival pigment print, 14 by 15½ inches.
Kirsten Stolle
Kirsten Stolle, Bldg. #100, 2016; collage and ink on archival pigment print 15.5” x 14”

“Disarm” is a collage and drawing project examining the historical legacy and impact of the Cold War-era US Nike missile program within a 21st-century framework. Disarm re-purposes and neutralizes abandoned military spaces through archival photographs, collage, ink, and gouache. Images of underground missile silos, decontamination showers, guard stations, launch pads, and missiles are transformed into places of growth and activation.

Kirsten Stolle’s research-based practice is grounded in the investigation of corporate propaganda, environmental politics, and biotechnology. Her work examines the global influence of agrochemical and pharmaceutical corporations on our food supply and considers the connection between corporate interests and public health.

Stolle received a BA in visual arts from Framingham State University in Massachusetts and completed studies at Richmond College in London and Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. She lives and works in Marshall, North Carolina.

 


Dane Carder: “Better Angels” @ Red Arrow Gallery in Nashville through May 15
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