High Five: 5 Shows in the South — May 12

Mike Goodlett, "The Football Team"
Mike Goodlett, "The Football Team"
Mike Goodlett, The Football Team, 2016 -17, Hydrostone, plaster, cast fabric mold, concrete, ceramic stain, spray paint and thread.
Perversion of Form at 1708 Gallery in Richmond, through May 13

“Perversion of Form” explores the parallels between these artists’ adversarial attraction to traditional forms of art-making. Each artist employs process-based methods to subvert preconceptions of their craft. Robert Beatty is an artist and musician based in Lexington, Kentucky, who is sought after for his contemporary album art and illustrations for such publications as Lucky Peach, The Wire Magazine, and the New York TimesSarah Briland received an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis. In 2014, she was an Emerging Artist-in-Residence at Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State. Ryan Crowley is a Richmond-based sculptor who studied at Massachusetts College of Art and Design before earning his MFA from VCU in 2012. Ben Durham has had solo shows at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery in New York, Marc Selwyn Fine Art in Los Angeles, Lora Reynolds Gallery in Austin, and Reynolds Gallery in Richmond. Mike Goodlett lives in Wilmore, Kentucky, and has had solo exhibitions at the Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Christian Berst Gallery, New York, and Institute 193, Lexington.

Mike Goodlett, Untitled installation
Mike Goodlett, Untitled, 2016-17, Hydrostone, plaster, cast fabric mold, concrete, ceramic stain, spray paint, thread,. Image courtesy of Institute 193.
Ryan Crowley, Head, 2016, Fir, xerox of gum, borosilicate glass, cherry plywood, plaster, rabbit skin, glue, pigments, glass sheet
Ryan Crowley, Head, 2016, fir, Xerox of gum, borosilicate glass, cherry plywood, plaster, rabbit skin, glue, pigments, glass sheet.
Ryan Crowley, GUM, 2016, Plaster, cast bronze, plastic, paper pulp, dead light bulbs, pine, aluminum foil, steel wire.
Ryan Crowley, GUM, 2016, plaster, cast bronze, plastic, paper pulp, dead light bulbs, pine, aluminum foil, steel wire.
Mike Goodlett, Untitled, 2014, graphite and sewn thread on paper.
Mike Goodlett, Untitled, 2014, graphite and sewn thread on paper.
Ryan Crowley, Moth
Ryan Crowley, Moth, 2016; plaster, plywood, plastic, spray enamel, bendy plywood, blue ink pen.
Sarah Briland, Problematica (Foam Rock Seep), 2017, Polyurethane foam, aqua-resin, glass
Sarah Briland, Problematica (Foam Rock Seep), 2017, polyurethane foam, Aqua-Resin, glass.

Coinciding with the National Rifle Association’s annual convention in Atlanta, “Unloaded” is presented by Dashboard, curated by Susanne Slavick, with local additions curated and commissioned by Dashboard. On view through May 20.
Inflatable tank by Joe Peragine.
Inflatable tank by Joe Peragine.
Photo by Nancy Floyd.
Photo by Nancy Floyd.
Mel Chin, Mel Chin Cross for the Unforgiven: 10th Anniversary Multiple; 1 of 2
Mel Chin, Cross for the Unforgiven: 10th Anniversary Multiple; 1 of 2, 2012; AK-47 assault riffles (cut and welded)
54 by 54 by 3 inches.

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Installation view of "Unloaded" at Marcia Wood Gallery.
Installation view of “Unloaded” at Marcia Wood Gallery.
Installation view of "Unloaded" at Marcia Wood Gallery.
Installation view of “Unloaded” at Marcia Wood Gallery.

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Installation view of "Unloaded" at Marcia Wood Gallery.
Installation view of “Unloaded” at Marcia Wood Gallery.
Installation view of "Unloaded" at Marcia Wood Gallery Annex with video by Paul Stephen Benjamin and Hibernating Bear by Mary Engel.
Installation view of “Unloaded” at Marcia Wood Gallery Annex with video, far right, by Paul Stephen Benjamin and bullet-covered Hibernating Bear by Mary Engel.
Mary Engel, Hibernating Bear
Mary Engel, Hibernating Bear, 2017; mixed media with bullets, 11 by 27 by 36 inches.

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Installation view of "Unloaded" at Marcia Wood Gallery Annex.Left wall, photos by Nancy Floyd, suspended globe by Carl James, and mannequin by Lonnie Holley.
Installation view of “Unloaded” at Marcia Wood Gallery Annex. Left wall, photos by Nancy Floyd, suspended globe by Carl Janes, and mannequin by Lonnie Holley.
Installation view of "Unloaded" at Marcia Wood Gallery Annex.
Installation view of “Unloaded” at Marcia Wood Gallery Annex.
On back wall, Jason Kofke gun sculptures carved out of soap.
Foreground, mannequin and guns by Lonnie Holley. On back wall, Jason Kofke gun sculptures carved out of soap.
Carved soap guns by Jason Kofke.
Carved soap guns by Jason Kofke.

Lauren Fensterstock: Holophusicon at MOCA Jacksonville, through June 18

This atrium project, Portland-based artist Lauren Fensterstock is inspired by Holophusicon, an 18th-century natural history and ethnographical museum in London, and American artist Robert Smithson’s Mirror with Crushed Shells in Sanibel, Florida. Fensterstock creates site-specific installations that render the natural world in an entirely synthetic and monochromatic way, often using paper, charcoal and Plexiglas. Fensterstock’s monochromatic sculptures appear bleak and monolithic from a distance, but intricacies emerge up close. For this project, Fensterstock collected shells in her native Maine and Sanibel Island to produce large ornamental cabinets as well as loose, organic stalactites on the wall.

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Brady Haston: Fragmentary Survey & Douglas Degges: Split Ends at Zeitgeist Gallery, Nashville, through June 24

Brady Haston’s works abstractly reference obscure landmarks, urban reference points, and geology in Nashville. Several of the paintings incorporate drawings based on the local environment. Treehouse and The New, Old Forest reference the large, hollow sycamore tree that Bigfoot Spencer, one of Middle Tennessee’s first white settlers, lived in one winter. Haston notes: “There is a definite conceit when a contemporary abstract painting refers to the past. At best, the work will engage the audience through an elaborate metaphor and create a conversation that expands their knowledge of this specific area while helping to orient the viewer in a local, ongoing history.”

Brady Haston, Burden, 2016, 15 by 18 inches.
Brady Haston, Burden, 2016, 15 by 18 inches.
Brady Haston, The New Old Forest, 2016, 48 by 60 inches.
Brady Haston, The New Old Forest, 2016, 48 by 60 inches.
Treehouse, 2015, 21 by 29 inches.
Brady Haston, Treehouse, 2015, 21 by 29 inches.
Brady Haston, Stratification
Brady Haston, Stratification, 2016, 15 by 18 inches.
Works by Brady Haston.
Works by Brady Haston.
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Paintings by Brady Haston.

“Split Ends” features two groups of paintings that celebrate slowness: slowness in looking and slowness in making. These works allude to a high speed world dominated by immediate access to anything, from sourcing information on the internet to our ability to capture and store images at a moment’s notice. Douglas Degges was born in Louisiana and currently lives in Chattanooga. He received his MFA from the University of Iowa and has been an artist-in-residence at the Millay Colony and the Vermont Studio Center.

Douglas Degges with his paintings at the exhibition opening.
Chattanooga artist Douglas Degges with his paintings at the exhibition opening.
Douglas Degges
Douglas Degges paintings.

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Painting by Douglas Degges.
Painting by Douglas Degges.

 

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