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FLUX NIGHT 2013

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A very busy Walker Street. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
A very busy Walker Street. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.

Flux Projects, led by Anne Archer Dennington, once again presented FLUX NIGHT, a one-night-only public art event in Castleberry Hill. One could call it a street party where the art is free and the beer isn’t. Six of the 20 official entries for 2013 were curated by Helena Reckitt under the theme Free Association, which “evokes the pleasure of mixing and mingling at street level.”

Georgia Museum of Art

On Saturday, October 5, 2013, people mingled on Walker and Peters streets by the hundreds. FLUX NIGHT presented dance, music, video, photography, a fountain, installations, and performers. While Reckitt and the Flux Projects Committee selected the official projects, local galleries and shops cashed in on the big crowds for FLUX. Plenty of unofficial artists and performers lined the busy streets hoping to get a bit of attention. And there were plenty of people in costume to add flavor to the night.

While big exhibits like Rhonda Weppler and Trevor Mahovsky’s Late Night Convenience and Sophie Farewell’s However you do it are clearly planned and official, typical visitors look and listen to everything they come across, not knowing whether it is an official part of FLUX NIGHT. And that seems to be the beauty of it. So many energetic people vying for attention gives the night a carnival atmosphere, with all ingredients making the stated theme of street mingling come to life. People gather around to watch “official entry” Core Performance Company perform Above and Below, as well as to watch Hula-Hoopers spinning on Walker Street.

The one-night-only nature of FLUX provides additional excitement. You must see it now or not see it at all. Some projects, such as videos, can be repurposed, but most will be thrown out with a few bits kept in closets as souvenirs. Some will leave strong impressions, others will be quickly forgotten. Artists toil for weeks or months to become a part of this fleeting extravaganza, hoping that their work or performance will be remembered.

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Kathleen Ritter, The revolution is not a party. Photo courtesy John E. Ramspott.
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Sophie Farewell, However you do it. Photo courtesy John E. Ramspott.
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Core Performance Company, Above and Below. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Pablo Gnecco, Array. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Micah and Whitney Stansell, An inversion (with sky and land). Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Air cannon inside Erikson Clock Building. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Amy Pursifull, Juan Ricardo Forero & Santiago Paramo, Marimbula. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Pablo Bronstein, Plaza Minuet. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Fahamu Pecou, OVEREXPOS(d). Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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Sasha Krieger, Soliloquy. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
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People picking their lantern at Late Night Convenience by Rhonda Weppler & Trevor Mahovsky. Photo courtesy of John E. Ramspott.
A hula hoop girl in the waning hours of FLUX NIGHT. Photo courtesy John E. Ramspott.
A hula hoop girl in the waning hours of FLUX NIGHT. Photo courtesy John E. Ramspott.