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In 200 Words: Beep Beep Throws a Gold Party

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SCAD - Derrick Adams
Installation shot of Gold Rush at Beep Beep, featuring works by (l to r) Ally White, Paige Adair, Steve Pomberg, and Paige Adair.
Installation shot of Gold Rush at Beep Beep, featuring works by (l to r) Ally White, Paige Adair, Steve Pomberg, and Paige Adair.

Seven-year old Beep Beep Gallery likes to kick off each year with a show of new artists. This year, works by seven emerging artists have been brought together for a “gold party,” the hard-times version of a Tupperware party.

Steve Pomberg’s brightly striped board paintings employ a surprisingly distressed and nicked surface. Splinters poking out of Pomberg’s boards echo the elaborate fur-covered frame of Paige Adair’s adjacent video piece . Her animation transforms the classic cinematic kiss to an amoeba-like touching of tongues, and shares a concern for gender that is seen her watercolors of interiors, with their decorative masculine and feminine elements[SU7] . Across from these works are Michael Polomik’s mythical paintings, which include diagrammatic lines and symbols that elaborate upon Pomberg’s simple geometry. They form a quiet, rigorous counterpoint to the neighboring large canvases by Jonathan Welsh and Ally White. Like Adair’s empty interiors, White’s collaged rooms, inhabited by women, create a different but equally feminist critique of gendered space.

Installation shot featuring works by (l to r) Michael Polomik, Jonathon Welsh, and Ally White.
Installation shot featuring works by (l to r) Michael Polomik, Jonathon Welsh, and Ally White.

While the pope’s gold teeth in Welsh’s mixed-media painting Today Could be the Day have a clear satirical bite, the surrealistically distorted figures of Olive Lynch and Nick Madden perhaps do as well. Lynch’s works on paper, some incised to reveal a secondary surface beneath, and Madden’s graphic paintings, whose figures swell out from the surface, toy with the confines of the picture plane.

SCAD - Derrick Adams

The show feels more like a thoughtful conversation than a bartering of gold, and picking up on some of the threads of conversation is one of the pleasures in viewing it.

“Gold Party” is on view through February 6.

Linnea West, a recently returned native of Athens, Georgia, is a writer and art blogger pursuing a Masters in Art History at the University of Georgia.